Discussion blog posts on “gaydar” and performance

With your group, select and read one of the blog posts linked below. Then answer the following questions together (post your answers as a comment here)

Exotic Taboo (Racialicious) – on being a South Asian and queer burlesque dancer

Black Freaks, Black F**s, Black Dy**s (Racialicious, via Feminist Wire) – on the concept of “black cool” and masculinity

Is Your Bridal Gown Gay? (dapperQ) – on lesbians and wedding dresses

Queer Hair for the Postmodern Dandy (Huffpost Gay Voices) – on facial hair and assimilation as a transman

Questions

How does the concept of “gaydar” figure into this post – what does the author say or imply about it?

How are identity categories other than sexuality implicated in the concept of gaydar? For example, how does the author’s experience speak to the relationship between perceptions of queer identity and identity categories such as race, gender, class, and/or nationality?

Does the author make any points that you find problematic? If so, explain.

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2 thoughts on “Discussion blog posts on “gaydar” and performance

  1. Ken Greller says:

    1. The author wants to be identified as an out trans-man, and hopes that his sartorial/follicle, although specifically privileged to a male body, will indicate his queer identity.

    2. The author’s maleness is also something to be found “on radar”, his affinity for things like scotch, beer, etc also support this maleness. However, he “curls” the mustache so as to put his queerness more “out there.”

    3. The only real problematics of this post are the implied class/white male privilege status of the author. He appears to exist in a very queer-friendly world in which passing is not essential to survival, and he (apparently) has the means not only to put himself through testosterone, but also to afford things like scotch, suits, fine furniture, and mustache wax.

  2. rosalietinelli says:

    How does the concept of “gaydar” figure into this post – what does the author say or imply about it?
    Gaydar does not apply to the wedding dress. However, the other woman is in a suit, making the assumption that she is the masculine one in the relationship. It’s not so much telling if they’re gay but rather which role they are taking on in the relationship

    How are identity categories other than sexuality implicated in the concept of gaydar? For example, how does the author’s experience speak to the relationship between perceptions of queer identity and identity categories such as race, gender, class, and/or nationality?
    Gender roles become more prominent with the outfits. There aren’t always specific gender roles in a lesbian relationship, they each take one on because that is what people expect. A wedding is like putting on a show, one has to be the masculine one and one has to be feminine for it to be considered more normal.

    Does the author make any points that you find problematic? If so, explain.
    We don’t think that Sarah is “transgressing bridal fashion” as this is a very normal dress. Also, the concept of a “gay blender” just because it is a gay wedding was strange.

    –Saad, Gabby, & Rosalie

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